Avoid - or heal - bee stings and bug bites

Avoid - or heal - bee stings and bug bites »Play Video

Share your bug bite stories on KVAL.com or send your story and photos to kvalnews@kval.com

EUGENE, Ore. - One of the joys of summer is spending time in the great outdoors running, hiking and biking - until you run into a little bug with a big bite or sting.

A bee sting or a mosquito or bug bite can ruin your backyard barbecue or a day at the park.

Here's what you can do to minimize the pain.

How to handle a bee sting

If a bee stings you, use a credit card or piece of cardboard to scrape your arm and remove the stinger and venom sack. You don't want to use tweezers because that can squeeze the venom sack and make the sting worse.

If you're allergic to bees, use your prescription injection, like an EpiPen. If you don't have it around, call 911.

When do I need to see a doctor about a bug bite?

To treat the itch from a bug bite, use an over-the-counter steroid cream or antihistamine cream.

You might even need to visit a health care professional after a bug bite.

"We look at mostly if there's signs of infection," said Diana Lamboy, a family nurse practitioner with PeaceHealth. "That would be redness, swelling, if you've got like a gunky discharge that's coming out, draining or it's painful."

Should I use tweezers to remove a tick?

And don't forget about ticks. They can be nasty souvenirs from a hike. Wear light-colored long-sleeve shirts and pants to make dark ticks easy to spot, and stay on the trail and out of deep grass to avoid ticks.

If one bites you, don't use tweezers to take it off. Use a candle or lighter near the bottom of the tick, said Lamboy. They don't like heat and it will make them let go of you.

Share your bug bite stories on KVAL.com or send your story and photos to kvalnews@kval.com