Health

Health Reading Harry Potter gives clues to brain activity Reading Harry Potter gives clues to brain activity
Reading about Harry Potter's adventures learning to fly his broomstick activates some of the same regions in the brain we use to perceive real people's actions and intentions.
Health Administration says HealthCare.gov working well Administration says HealthCare.gov working well
As a crucial second sign-up season gears up, the Obama administration said Sunday that HealthCare.gov is stable and working well, a far cry from last year's frozen computer screens and frustrated customers.
Health Helmets have become commonplace on the slopes Helmets have become commonplace on the slopes
They come in nearly every color scheme imaginable, from camouflage to bright pink. Most skiers and snowboarders on the slopes are wearing them, and if you're not, well, you are not just reckless, you are . GASP! . unfashionable.
Health Ebola volunteers wrestle with quarantine mandates Ebola volunteers wrestle with quarantine mandates
Dr. Robert Fuller didn't hesitate to go to Indonesia to treat survivors of the 2004 tsunami, to Haiti to help after the 2010 earthquake or to the Philippines after a devastating typhoon last year. But he's given up on going to West Africa to care for Ebola patients this winter.
Health Ebola: Scientists try to predict how bad it can get Ebola: Scientists try to predict how bad it can get
Top medical experts studying the spread of Ebola say the public should expect more cases to emerge in the United States by year's end as infected people arrive here from West Africa, including American doctors and nurses returning from the hot zone and people fleeing from the deadly disease.
Health New home test shakes up colon cancer screening New home test shakes up colon cancer screening
Starting Monday, millions of people who have avoided colon cancer screening can get a new home test that's noninvasive and doesn't require the icky preparation most other methods do.
Health New military medical team to help with Ebola in US New military medical team to help with Ebola in US
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has ordered the military to prepare and train a 30-member medical support team that could provide short-term help to civilian health professionals if there are more Ebola cases in the United States.
Health Officials fear Ebola's on AIDS path; some disagree Officials fear Ebola's on AIDS path; some disagree
Comparisons between the two deadly diseases surfaced in the last few months as the Ebola outbreak escalated. Both emerged from Africa and erupted into an international health crisis. And both have been a shocking reminder that mankind's battle against infectious diseases can take a sudden, terrible turn for the worse.
Health Gay-rights group backs use of HIV-prevention pill Gay-rights group backs use of HIV-prevention pill
The largest U.S. gay-rights organization Saturday endorsed efforts to promote the use of a once-a-day pill to prevent HIV infection and called on insurers to provide more generous coverage of the drug.
Health Federal officials cast doubt on Ebola travel ban Federal officials cast doubt on Ebola travel ban
Top government health officials said Sunday that they are opposed to placing a ban on travelers from Ebola-infected countries, warning that shutting down borders could impede efforts by aid workers to stop the spread of the deadly virus.
Health Ebola in US: People scared, but outbreak unlikely Ebola in US: People scared, but outbreak unlikely
Ebola has arrived in the United States and people are scared. The nation's top infectious diseases expert said it's perfectly normal to feel anxious about a disease that kills so fast and is ravaging parts of West Africa.
Health Viagra ads target women for 1st time Viagra ads target women for 1st time
The maker of the world's top-selling erectile dysfunction drug on Tuesday will begin airing the first Viagra TV commercial that targets the less-obvious sufferers of the sexual condition: women.
Health Pediatricians urge IUDs or implants for teen girls Pediatricians urge IUDs or implants for teen girls
Teen girls who have sex should use IUDs or hormonal implants — long-acting birth control methods that are effective, safe and easy to use, the nation's most influential pediatricians' group recommends.
Health Guilty verdict in peanut trial should send warning Guilty verdict in peanut trial should send warning
Food safety advocates say a guilty verdict in a rare federal food-poisoning trial should send a stern warning to anyone who may be tempted to place profits over people's welfare.
Health News you should use: tomatoes and prostate cancer News you should use: tomatoes and prostate cancer
Tomatoes and Prostate Cancer; Big Base, Great Workout; Fun Reduces Eating; Train Your Brain to Eat Healthier; All Diets Work; Walks for Sitting; Freshman Women Can Eat Healthier
Health Study: Artificial sweeteners may promote diabetes Study: Artificial sweeteners may promote diabetes
Using artificial sweeteners may set the stage for diabetes in some people by hampering the way their bodies handle sugar, suggests a preliminary study done mostly in mice.
Health How to avoid body pain from work (your desk, chair, slumping) How to avoid body pain from work (your desk, chair, slumping)
Recently, I was able to catch up with an expert on physical therapy and dance, Colorado-based Mieke Scripps. She studied dance and kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin while performing in the modern dance troop Li Chiao-Ping Dance. After her dance career, she received her doctorate in physical therapy from Northwestern University and then worked as a physical therapist for the New York City Ballet, the School of American Ballet, the Miami City Ballet, the Juilliard School and on many Broadway shows. Mieke found that yoga was an effective and safe complementary movement therapy to improve stability and strength while also increasing flexibility. She has recently relocated to Colorado and is integrating physical therapy with her expertise in yoga training for the Colorado Ballet Academy and in her own private practice. I was able to do an extensive three-part email interview with Dr. Scripps.