Feds give Eugene woman free pot

Feds give Eugene woman free pot »Play Video
Elvy Musikka

EUGENE, Ore. - You might call it her morning routine.

With her lighter in hand, 72-year-old Elvy Musikka gets a cannabis buzz every day, courtesy of the federal government.

"It does give you a push. The high is nothing but feeling good about things," she said sitting on her couch in her South Eugene apartment.

The grandmother, who uses cannabis for her glaucoma, is part of a very unique club.

Since 1988, Musikka has been getting more than three and a half pounds of pot every year from the federal government.

"These are the tins that the federal government sends to the University of Miami," she said pointing to her rolled joints. "I have to go there and see my doctor and pick up a prescription. I call them my green Pall Malls."

She's part of the "Compassionate New Drug Access Program."
     
It started in 1976 after a man sued the government, claiming only pot helped his glaucoma.
    
The National Institute on Drug Abuse or "NIDA" provided rolled joints for sick people until the first Bush Administration halted it in 1992.

"Every single one of us had to have reliable doctors that they would count on, extensive medical records, and had to prove to FDA, DEA and NIDA," Musikka said. "I eventually became the first woman to join the two men who were smoking legally at the time."

The program has been closed for almost 20 years, but the FDA still allows the remaining four patients, including Musikka, to receive the cannabis.

"I'm just so glad I found this, I really take it in the spirit of Thanksgiving every single day," she said.

The cannabis is grown at the University of Mississippi.
    
She also is an Oregon medical marijuana card holder.
    
Under that program she must grow her own pot or have someone else grow it.