Duck star Cliff Harris sorts out traffic citations in court

Duck star Cliff Harris sorts out traffic citations in court »Play Video
Eugene attorney Michael Buseman and Oregon Duck All-American football player Cliff Harris

EUGENE, Ore. - A star Duck football player suspended from the team since police pulled him over and cited him for traffic violations appeared in court Thursday to settle the charges.

Eugene police pulled over All-American Cliff Harris Oct. 24 and cited him for driving without insurance, failure to wear a seatbelt and driving with a suspended license. He was suspended from all football-related activities the same day by Coach Chip Kelly.

Dave Williford with the University of Oregon athletic department told KVAL News on Thursday that Harris remains suspended.

It remains to be seen if Thursday's court proceedings will affect whether or not Harris will play against USC at Autzen Stadium this Saturday, although Williford told KVAL News he doesn't expect Harris' eligibility to change.

Michael Buseman, the attorney representing Harris, didn't know, either.

"I have no say in that, and I have no idea," he said. "I don't have any input there."

Harris pleaded guilty to the seatbelt charge in Eugene Municipal Court on Thursday, Nov. 17. He was fined $100.

Harris pleaded no contest to driving with a suspended license. A plea of no contest means a defendant does not admit guilty but acknowledges a court would be likely to convict based on the evidence. The court placed him on 60 days diversion and ordered him to pay a $300 fine.

"Over the course of the next 60 days, Cliff just has to make sure he doesn't commit any similar offenses," Buseman said. "If he does that, in 60 days, which would be January 17, the driving while suspended charge will be dismissed."

The court dismissed the charge of driving without insurance. The car belonged to Harris' mother and was insured.

KVAL News was in court Thursday and spoke with Harris and Buseman after the proceedings.

This wasn't Harris' first run-in with the law over traffic violations. In June 2011, he was cited after police clocked him doing 118 mph on Interstate 5 near Albany.

"What he said to me was if you fall down seven times, you gotta get up eight," Buseman said with his client by his said, "and I thought that was pretty good advice."

"I think he knows what he needs to do, that Cliff Harris is fully capable of doing that and that Cliff Harris will do that."

This is a developing story. Watch KVAL.com and KVAL 13 TV News at noon for updates