Living in Oregon: New laws for the New Year

Living in Oregon: New laws for the New Year
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EUGENE, Ore. -- Sorry, Oregon: Come 2010, there'll be no more dialing seven digits to yack on the cell phone while driving off-highway with a child on board without a seatbelt en route to the dump to get rid of your old TV.

A slew of new laws take effect in January, requiring Oregonians and our guests to abide by a few new rules.

HANG UP AND DRIVE

The days of holding a cell phone to your ear while you drive are limited.  Oregon's new hands-free cell phone law takes effect January 1, 2010.  It's designed to help drivers focus on the road and keep both hands on the wheel. | FAQs

'867-5309' BEHIND THE TIMES

For a good time, all calls in Oregon will require 10-digits -- the number, preceded by the area code. Oregon was running out of 541 numbers, requiring the state to add a second 458 area code for much of Oregon. Ten-digit dialing was already the norm in the Portland metropolitan area and for anyone dialing from a cellular telephone. | MORE

IF YOU KILL YOUR TELEVISION, RECYCLE THE BODY

A new law bans Covered Electronic Devices, or CEDs, from landfills. CEDs are television sets, monitors, computers and laptops. Sanitation companies can face steep fines if a CED is traced back to their trucks, so they will no longer pick electronics up. Instead, you need to find a qualified e-cycling location. | MORE

BUCKLE UP

Those seatbelts need to stay on kids even after you shift the Jeep into 4-Low and hit the trail less traveled.

"Basically, laws governing the use of safety restraints by anyone 16 years of age or under in vehicles on roads and highways will now apply to off-road vehicle riding," said John Lane, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department's ATV safety education coordinator.

Anyone with questions can call the state ATV toll-free hotline—877-7SAFELY (877-772-3359)—or e-mail them to atv.info@state.or.us. OPRD's ATV website is www.oregonOHV.org.