Three spiders that can bite you

Three spiders that can bite you
The black widow spider found by a Ballard family is seen Monday at the Woodland Park Zoo.

Watch the Bites, Stings and Creepy Crawly Things series on KVAL 13 TV News at 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. through July 9. | Share your bug bite stories on KVAL.com or send your story and photos to kvalnews@kval.com

EUGENE, Ore.--With their extra eyes and legs, spiders scare many people. 

One of the most poisonous spiders is the daddy long legs, said Ross Penhallegon with the Oregon State University Lane County Extension Service, but it can't harm humans. 

"They can't do anything because they can't bite you," said Penhallegon.

He is eager to point out all spiders have a benefit -- controlling pests around homes and gardens.

While most spiders are afraid of humans, some venomous spiders have been known to bite people.

Black widow

With it's shiny black body and the red hourglass shape on it's abdomen, the black widow is easy to identify--if you can spot one.

Black widows like to hide under houses, away from people.

Hobo spider 

Hobo spiders are brown with a white stripes and spot on their abdomens. You'll find them in wood piles and near concrete walls.

"They like to be hidden, you're going to find them low on the ground and there's going to be funnel webs," said Lloyd Walker, service manager at Swanson's Pest Management.

A female protecting eggs might be aggressive, but hobos are generally afraid of people.

A hobo spider KVAL News found outside the OSU Extension Service building retreated into its web when we tried to touch it.

Brown recluse

"Every time someone gets bit, they think it's the brown recluse," said Walker.  It's usually a hobo spider.

The dreaded brown recluse has three sets of eyes, grouped in twos, but it's not native to Oregon. 

It comes from the Midwest, said Walker.

"We have had bites here in the Northwest," said Walker.  "Usually when something is shipped here from that part of the country and they're going through it and they get bit."

They typically cannot survive cold temperatures.

"I don't think we've officially had one over winter here," said Penhallegon.

Watch the Bites, Stings and Creepy Crawly Things series on KVAL 13 TV News at 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. through July 9. | Share your bug bite stories on KVAL.com or send your story and photos to kvalnews@kval.com