After living through fire and cancer, girl's in good spirits

After living through fire and cancer, girl's in good spirits »Play Video
Neither cancer nor fire or a little rain is keeping 12-year-old Ireland Lane down as she walks with her father Wednesday. Ireland is recovering from third-degree burns after catching fire at a local hospital more than a month ago.

PORTLAND, Ore. – Just 12 years old, Ireland Lane's little body is recovering from third-degree burns after catching fire during a bizarre accident at a local hospital more than a month ago.

Investigators determined it was a strange mix of hand sanitizer, olive oil and static electricity that sparked the flames.

She's definitely one tough cookie after all she's been through. She was feeling a bit tired Wednesday but was otherwise good. And that's saying a lot after living through the fire and being a cancer survivor.

Ireland doesn't remember catching fire at Doernbecher Children's Hospital but she knows what happened moments before.

"I was making a little paper clip photo for my nurses," she said.

And she remembers waking up afterward wrapped in bandages and facing skin grafts taken from her head to repair her neck – just one step toward mending some of her third-degree burns.

She was burned from her chin to her stomach.

"Most of her pain is actually from the sites that they took the skin from, because a third-degree burn sears the nerve endings so you actually don't have any feeling," said her father Stephen.

He said most of her pain comes from the skin taken from her head. It's less painful across her chest. A compression shirt helps the brunt of her burns heal.

The day she caught fire, Ireland's shirt had olive oil on it, used to remove a sticky adhesive from a medical test.

That oil made the combination of hand sanitizer she used to clean up her art project and static electricity worse.

But her spirits are high and her determination to heal is strong.

Her dad said she had scars on her chest before from chemotherapy. She's been through 41 surgeries.

She's gotten cards and gifts from strangers all the way from London.

She and her father are looking forward to going home the first week of April. The skin grafts won't completely heal for another year.