'I was just shocked they could do that and that there was no warning'

'I was just shocked they could do that and that there was no warning' »Play Video
"I got a little door hanger saying they were gonna be doing some work on the water and the water would be out for three hours," Jered Nagel said, "and that's all it said."

EUGENE, Ore. - Jered Nagel came home last month to find a chunk of his driveway gone, filled in with asphalt.

Some of his grass was covered with cement.

"I was like OK, I'll give them a couple days, and they're probably going to come right back and fix it," the South Eugene homeowner said.

But nothing.

So he made some calls.

"EWEB said Eugene was going to fix it, and then Eugene said no, EWEB was going to fix it," Nagel said.

This past Monday - 2 weeks after the original work - crews cover the asphalt with concrete.

His grass is still a mess.

And Nagel still doesn't have any concrete answers.

"I was just shocked they could do that and that there was no communication, no warning," he said.

"He was notified when he received a door hanger," said Joe Harwood with EWEB.

Nagel still has the door hanger.

"I got a little door hanger saying they were gonna be doing some work on the water and the water would be out for three hours," Nagel said, "and that's all it said."

The door hanger says nothing about tearing up his front yard.

That's because it's technically city property, Harwood said.

"It goes from the center of the road to a little past where the sidewalk is," he said, "sometimes into the driveway, and that driveway where that curb cut is is also public right away."

Nagel now wonders what'll happen to the grass area in his front yard that was torn apart and left covered with rocks and gravel.

"People in my family are like, this is outrageous, you need to say something, you can't stand for this," he said.

The work was being done in advance of a City of Eugene street project on Nagel's block. Eric Jones with the City of Eugene said they try to give notice to homeowners but, with the busy summer construction season, suspects it was just overlooked.

"It's just the way it is," Harwood said. "This is the minor inconveniences we face in modern life to have good roads and on demand clean water."