'Most of the people who look at it don't realize that we're that old'

'Most of the people who look at it don't realize that we're that old' »Play Video
"What grade were you in? Who are you in the picture?" customers ask, Joe Robertson said. "They can't figure out which one I am."

EUGENE, Ore. - The fine print on the black and white photo of a youth baseball team reads:

KVAL-TV - CHAMPIONS -1959
E.B.A.A. - NATIONAL LEAGUE

"This was the championship team back in 1959, and they ranged from 6th grade through the 8th grade," said Joe Robertson, one of the youth in the picture. "Back in those days all the businesses sponsored teams."

The photo - along with a basketball team photo from 1963 that includes Joe's younger brother Tommy - are on display over the tables at Jiffy Market, the family store in South Eugene started by their parents.

"Somebody from Kidsports sent somebody down here to see if we had any old photos of one of our teams back when we were in the EBAA - the Eugene Boys Athletic Association," Joe explained. "So we found 2 or 3 of them and brought them down and they took them out for their Kidsports 50th anniversary and they blew them up and brought these back to us, so that was kind of nice of them."

Joe's brother Tommy decided to put the photos up. 

They've become conversation pieces.

"What grade were you in? Who are you in the picture?" customers ask, Joe said. "They can't figure out which one I am. They can pick him out pretty easily."

"I think most of the people who look at it don't realize that we're that old," Tommy said.

His 13-year-old self is standing in the front row with high-top socks hiked all they way up to his knees. "They hid my hairy legs," he said.

"This is from the Roosevelt Junior High School basketball team, 1963. We were the Rough Riders," Tommy explained. "We didn't have computers, so yeah, we had to play sports."

That year coincides with a landmark date for the Robertson family.

"It's the first year that my mom and dad started Jiffy Market," Tommy said. "I actually worked here then as a box boy, and I'm still here 50 years later."