Powerless: 'It's still hard to tell customers estimated times'

Powerless: 'It's still hard to tell customers estimated times' »Play Video
Shelly Eubank of Veneta

VENETA, Ore. - Shelly Eubank lost power last weekend.

"About 3 o'clock Saturday afternoon, a branch took out a power line," she said Tuesday, still without power.

The storm is over, and the snow and ice have melted.

But for the thousands of people in Western Oregon still without since Saturday, the storm's aftermath is still being felt.

Eubank said she's been calling her power provider - Emerald PUD - around the clock since her electricity went out.

"They told us last night that they would bump us up to the top of the line, be somebody out here this morning," she said.

By 10 a.m., no one had showed up yet.

Jamie Cranmer with Emerald PUD said taht at one point they had 10,000 customers without power.

By Tuesday, they were down to 1,500.

In Eugene, EWEB had 6,000 customers without power at one point. By late Monday night, power remained out to just under 1,000 customers.

Lane Electric Co-Op still had 776 customers without power as of 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, according to the utility's power outage map, down from 2,200 Monday afternoon.

Cranmer said EPUD's progress hasn't been fast enough for customers who haven't had power since Satuday.

"Right now it's still hard to tell customers estimated times," Cranmer said. "It has been from the beginning."

EWEB posted an outage map and a work list on the utility's website as customers posted on the utility's Facebook page looking for updates.

EWEB warned that some of the work left to do could be slow going as they access lines in backyards and hard-to-reach places. Single-customer outages might be without power through Wednesday, EWEB said.

And even as crews worked to restore power, Mother Nature threatened to serve up high winds that could dislodge broken branches or bring down trees damaged by last week's snow and ice.

"The unfortunate part is it sounds like more storms are coming today and are going to bring winds," Cranmer said, "and we hope that keeps the trees away from falling more."