UW stars Stevens, Solo involved in assault investigation before wedding

UW stars Stevens, Solo involved in assault investigation before wedding »Play Video
Soccer star Hope Solo leaves a courtroom with her lawyer Peter Offenbecher, left, before a bail hearing for Seattle Seahawks player Jerramy Stevens.
KIRKLAND, Wash. -- Jerramy Stevens, a former University of Washington tight end and Seahawks draft pick, was arrested early Monday for investigation of assault following an altercation that left his fiancée, soccer star Hope Solo injured, according to police.

Stevens was booked into jail for investigation of fourth-degree assault after police responded to a disturbance at a home in Kirkland and got conflicting stories from Hope and her brother, who was also at the house.

No charges have been filed, and on Tuesday afternoon a judge found no probable cause to keep Stevens in custody and released him without condition.

According to a police report, Stevens and Hope were planning to marry on Tuesday.

The police investigation began when Marcus Solo called 911 about 3:45 a.m. and said several intoxicated people had been in a fight, according to the report.

When officers arrived Marcus had blood on his forehead and a bruise under his eye. His sister, Hope, had blood on her elbow from a cut but would not explain how she got hurt, an officer wrote in the police report.

According to the report, Marcus and Hope told officers there was a party and several unwanted guests showed up and got into a fight with Marcus, who told police he used a stun gun on one of the men.

Kirkland police said Marcus and Hope gave different descriptions of the men involved and each gave a different reason for what started the fight.

According to the report, Hope yelled "don't say anything to them Marcus" at her brother several times while they were being questioned by police.

An officer went into the house and found blood on the floor, another injured woman, and blood along a staircase handrail.

The officer reached an upstairs bedroom and found Stevens apparently hiding on the floor between a wall and bed, according to the report.

Stevens insisted he was sleeping, not hiding, and said he did not hear the fight.

According to the report, Stevens had dried blood on his shirt and cheek and there were signs of a fight in the bedroom. Stevens said the blood on his face was from a kiss from Hope, but he would not explain the blood on his shirt, police said.

He told the officer he and Hope had been fighting about whether they would live in Florida or Washington after their planned marriage on Tuesday, according to police. Court records show the two applied for a marriage license on Thursday last week.

Police said they decided to arrest Stevens based on the signs of the fight in the bedroom, Hope's injury and the blood on Stevens' shirt.

Kirkland police say the second woman who was injured had suffered a hip injury and told officers she was attacked by a man who had come to the party but ran before police arrived. She could only provide a vague description.

Stevens, 33, has had other run-ins with the law. In June 2003, he pleaded guilty to reckless driving as part of a plea deal after being stopped in the Seattle suburb of Medina for investigation of drunken driving. He got a two-day jail sentence for that offense.

He received another five days in jail for violating his probation after he drove into a nursing home in 2000 in a hit-and-run case. Stevens was a student at Washington at the time of that incident.

In 2000 he was accused of sexual assault, but prosecutors decided not to file charges because of insufficient evidence.

Stevens was a first-round draft pick by the Seahawks, the 28th selection overall, in 2002. He had a career-best 45 catches for 554 yards, a record for Seattle tight ends, in the Seahawks' 2005 Super Bowl season.

Solo, 31, is a two-time gold medalist as goalkeeper for the U.S. Women's Soccer Team, helping lead the team to victories in Beijing in 2008 and London in 2012.

Solo is originally from Richland, Wash., and attended the University of Washington where she was a star goalkeeper for the women's soccer team. She finished as the school's all-time leader in shutouts, saves and goals against average.