Bucket Project: 'When they hear us, they'll say wow'

Bucket Project: 'When they hear us, they'll say wow' »Play Video
"You're also playing on the top of the bucket, the back of the bucket and the side of the bucket," Steven Robinson said, "and then we have a 24 gallon and a 32 gallon garbage cans for your bass drums. So because of the different sizes, we also have different sounds."

JUNCTION, Ore. - This is not your typical band practice.

Steve Robinson is directing music - using buckets.

"I've seen the buckets being played, sit-down played, but I've never seen them marching before," Robinson said, "and so I got this idea, let's do this. So I went to my friend and said, here's a bucket, figure out how we can put it on and march."

Robinson is legally blind but lets the music guide the process.

"You're also playing on the top of the bucket, the back of the bucket and the side of the bucket," he said, "and then we have a 24 gallon and a 32 gallon garbage cans for your bass drums. So because of the different sizes, we also have different sounds."

Most of these students have never played the drums before, and it's only the band's third rehearsal.

"They're rehearsing together and improving together at the same time which we don't usually get in the regular band class," said Justin Lasley, the Junction City music director.

The school doesn't have a maching band, so the bucket project is a first.

But the buckets teach their own lessons, too.

"You can make music out of anything," said Cailer Curington, the senior class president. "You can make it out of your desk, out of your pencils, out of a bucket, it's a ton of fun."

"When we play on Friday night, people are going to see the buckets and go uh, that's weird," Robinson said, "but then when they hear us, they'll say wow - come watch us: go Tigers."