Fire near Canyonville burns 180 acres as fire season ignites early

Fire near Canyonville burns 180 acres as fire season ignites early

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DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. -- A forest fire southeast of Canyonville has tapped Douglas Forest Protective Association resources early in the season.

Fires were also reported on the Umpqua National Forest and across Western Oregon.

The Shively Creek Fire, located about 11 miles southeast of Canyonville, is burning in slash, re-prod and second growth plantations, said Kyle Reed of the DFPA.

The fire is located in steep, rugged terrain, making suppression tactics difficult.

Reed said in an early morning release that they have enough people on the fire, but have had to use people and equipment from other fire departments, due to the early fires for the season.

The fire was first reported to be 150 acres, but grew to 180 acres overnight as light showers and cooler temperatures aided firefighters in their suppression efforts. 

The cause of the fire is still under investigation. 

No homes are threatened, and no injuries have been reported. 

Residents in the Upper Cow Creek area can expect heavy fire traffic for several days as suppression efforts and mop up operations continue.

DFPA officials say there have been several fires started in the county from burn piles. Authorities are giving these tips to help prevent more from starting:

  • Refrain from burning if there is any doubt the debris pile may escape.
  • Make sure a fire trail is put around the pile.
  • Have a charged garden hose and fire tools on site.
  • Stay with the pile the entire time it is burning, and make sure the pile is completely out before you leave.

The Umpqua National Forest has also reported several fires, some caused by humans, while others were caused by lightning strikes on Sunday.

Two fires were human caused, according to officials, and another four were started by Sunday’s lightning storm.

One human-caused fire was on the Tiller Ranger District, and grew to 12 acres before being contained. That fire is under investigation.

The other fire, started by a downed power line near the South Shore Pizza Parlor at Diamond Lake, was less than 0.1 acre.

Of the lightning starts, officials say three fires are on North Umpqua Ranger District and the other is on the Tiller Ranger District.

The Oregon Department of Forestry reported a number of fires across Western Oregon:

The 10-acre Tokatee Fire in the South Cascade District is burning in logging slash, timber and grass. It was reported Saturday. ODF has three fire engines and one water tender at the fire. Cause is under investigation.

The 14-acre Raisor Road Fire in the South Cascade District is burning in timber and logging slash. The fire was reported Sunday and is in extended attack. Number of resources fighting the fire is unavailable at this time. Cause is under investigation. 

The 19-acre Jasper Lowell Fire in the South Cascade District burned in grass, brush and timber. Reported Sunday, it was contained by late afternoon and is currently in mop-up. ODF resources fighting the fire include three fire engines, two hand crews, one bulldozer and two water tenders. Cause is under investigation. 

The 168-acre Burgess Road Fire in the Central Oregon District is burning in timber, brush and grass. Reported Sunday, firefighters expected to achieve containment that evening. ODF resources fighting the fire include five fire engines, three hand crews, one bulldozer and one water tender. Cause is under investigation. 

The 22-acre Gooseneck Road Fire in the West Oregon District reported Saturday burning in logging slash. Six fire engines, one helicopter, two hand crews, one bulldozer and one water tender. Cause is under investigation. 

The 15-acre Milepost 160 Fire in Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) jurisdiction burned in logging slash near Interstate 5. It was contained and in mop-up on Saturday. DFP resources fighting the fire included two fire engines and one bulldozer. The fire was from a prescribed burn ignited April 29 that spread off of the burn unit.