Sled dog racing: 'If you do tip over, you've got to hang on'

Sled dog racing: 'If you do tip over, you've got to hang on' »Play Video

BEND, Ore. - The Iditarod is known "the last great race on Earth."

Competitors and their dog sled teams brave sub-zero temperatures, 50 mph headwinds and long hours of darkness.

Short of hopping on a plane bound for Anhorage, for someone new to sled dog racing the "Trail of Dreams" at Mount Bachelor may be the best place to start.

Jerry Scdoris showed KVAL News the ropes with the help of his daughter Rachel, a four-time Iditarod finisher.

"If you do tip over," Scdoris said, "you've got to hang on."

The dogs could tell Katie Boer and Bill Goetz from KVAL News wanted to go for a ride for the Extreme Katie series.

The dogs have serious power, each one capable of pulling up to a thousand pounds.

But go too fast and speed can send the sled right into a snow berm.

And anytime the sled goes slow enough to run, it's the musher job to get off the sled and give the dogs a break.

The trek at Mount Bachelor was six miles. An Iditarod is nearly 183 times as long.