Robinson: 'We've taken a tremendous step in the direction we want to go'

Robinson: 'We've taken a tremendous step in the direction we want to go' »Play Video
FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2010, file photo shows Republican Art Robinson, who was running against incumbent Democratic U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio, speaking to supporters before polls closed at the Douglas County Fairgrounds, in Roseburg, Ore. Campaign finance reports submitted over the weekend show that Republican Art Robinson is the only challenger to raise much money. He again tapped a national fundraising network that helped him spook Democratic incumbent Peter DeFazio in 2010. (AP Photo/The News-Review, Michael Sullivan, File)

EUGENE, Ore. - A different campaign, a different year - but the message is the same from Republican Art Robinson.

"I think the government has gotten way too big, and that of course is what's shutting down our economy," said Robinson, a candidate for Congress running against incumbent Rep. Peter DeFazio of Springfield.

The 2012 election is a rematch of the 2010 battle. That contest was noted for its testiness, and this year is no different.

KVAL News asked Robinson about DeFazio's claims that Robinson is a right wing extremist who's trying to eliminate public education. 

"Well, that's not true," Robinson said. "I do want to get the federal government out of public education and return our schools to local control."

Robinson filed a lawsuit against DeFazio over billboards sponsored by DeFazio's re-election committee designed to look like Robinson's billboards. The billboards are designed to look like they come from the Robinson campaign and make what he calls false claims about his stands on education and Social Security.

"When he started putting up big billboards, with no disclaimer at all, and my polls showed me that a lot of people believed that those were my boards, I took action," Robinson said.

Robinson blames big government and the deficit for the continued tepid recovery. He said the department of education and other agencies should be closed.

"Diminishing the impact of overreaching agencies in this country would be like the biggest tax cut in American history," Robinson said. "The economy would go straight up."

Robinson's 7,100 donors donated $370,000 in the third quarter, more than DeFazio, although the Congressman had more cash on hand.

Speaking before Republicans in Eugene monday, Robinson the scientist sounded confident.

"We've taken a tremendous step in the direction we want to go," he said.